My League Play Was Another Bust. League Report 3

My league play was another bust. One game under 100 and two slightly over. I didn’t even photograph the score to remember the detail for the League Report. I was that disheartened. I almost didn’t do this post out of shame. But then I remembered what old Jack Burton says when faced with the impossible. He says, “What the hell.”

I decided to do some work to try to figure out how to improve my game. I can’t keep doing the “once more unto the breach” stuff. Just having the guts to do poorly is missing the point. I watched a dozen or more YouTube videos. There are lots of helpers out there, and lots of contradictory advise. This guy makes sense. I’ll try his method next time.

While browsing the internet, though, I came across a lot of fun bowling stuff. Did you know that there are hidden oil patterns on the lane – patterns that are deliberately put there by the oiling machines. You can use them to your advantage if you know they’re there.

And this is a pinsetter machine. They’ve only had these for 60 years or so. I went behind the lanes with the manager of our alley and these are the machines they use. They are remarkable – and loud.

If you want to know the layout of the lanes and the pins, the distance between the foul line and the head pin and the rest, this drawing  and this lays it out (puns are low humor, I know). Each pin is 12 inches from the neighboring pins.

Do you want to know how a bowling pin is made today? It’s not simple. It has changed many times over the years, too, in response to new technology. This is brief history. Each pin is 15 inches tall and weighs about three-and-a-half pounds.

This is how a hook bowling ball is made. This video is from Ebonite.  Really interesting. Apparently the hook balls, balls that are weighted off center, weren’t even introduced until the 1990’s. This is more on the evolution of bowling balls.

Next time.